Proper Medical Care

2012-06-01_00002On a daily basis people are arriving at the farm in Mozambique seeking medical care. Word-of-mouth has it that care is available on this farm. With absolutely no medical background Corne serves the people with what she learned through raising her own 3 kids, but many of the cases leave her desperately helpless.

To illustrate the urgency for proper medical care, we want to tell you about “Mafiso” and her mother “Siphile”.

One Thursday afternoon Siphile arrived at the farm with the 2 months old girl Mafiso. We have no idée where she came from and how se ended up on the farm. Mafiso had an abscess on her chest. Providing the mother with temporary treatment Corne advised her to take the child to the hospital. The farm is not equipped or authorized to prescribe the child with the much needed antibiotics.

Two days later Siphile was back, but Mafiso was in a much worse condition. The abscess has ruptured, leaving two gashing wounds across her small chest. Explaining to her that we can not help her, and that the child will die, Siphile was urged to go to hospital.

We struggle to understand why she didn’t take the child to hospital in the first place. But we realized that in Kabinda – Mozambique, access to basic medical services is a major challenge. Below we will try to explain why such a simple exercise can become an impossible task.

On a daily basis people are arriving at the farm in Mozambique seeking medical care. Word-of-mouth has it that care is available on this farm. With absolutely no medical background Corne serves the people with what she learned through raising her own 3 kids, but many of the cases leave her desperately helpless.

To illustrate the urgency for proper medical care, we want to tell you about “Mafiso” and her mother “Siphile”.

One Thursday afternoon Siphile arrived at the farm with the 2 months old girl Mafiso. We have no idea where she came from and how se ended up on the farm. Mafiso had an abscess on her chest. Providing the mother with temporary treatment Corne advised her to take the child to the hospital. The farm is not equipped or authorized to prescribe the child with the much needed antibiotics.

Two days later Siphile was back, but Mafiso was in a much worse condition. The abscess has ruptured, leaving two gashing wounds across her small chest. Explaining to her that we can not help her, and that the child will die, Siphile was urged to go to hospital.

We struggle to understand why she didn’t take the child to hospital in the first place. But we realized that in Kabinda – Mozambique, access to basic medical services is a major challenge. Below we will try to explain why such a simple exercise can become an impossible task.

Saturday – 12 Oct 2013

  • Siphile will return home with Mafiso. It is too late to take-on the journey to Cazula. She will need to wait for Monday morning

Monday – 14 Oct 2013

  • Siphile will carry Mafiso, 16km to the junction at Massamba, to find a “taxi”. A walk of 4 hours.
  • Siphile will take a taxi (mashappa – open truck) toCazulaHospital. (35km). It is an “un-staffed” hospital with the most disgusting conditions. The truth is Siphile knows they will not be able to help her, but see needs a referral letter to be able to got to the Tete Hospital.
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  • Siphile will return to Massamba (35km), but it will be too late for here to walk back home (16km) before dark. She and Mafiso will sleep in the field.

Tuesday – 15 Oct 2013

  • Siphile will take a mashappa to Tete (70km). This is a 2 hour drive on the back of an open truck with 30 other people.
  • Arriving at the Tete Hospital, Mafiso will probable be admitted for surgery, while Siphile will sleep on the street outside of the Hospital until Mafiso is released.

All of this travelling will cost Siphile about (US) $30. With 95% of the people being unemployed, Siphile might never have reached the hospital.

We do not know what happened to Siphile and Mafiso and have no way of tracing them, but this is the story of hundreds of people around us. Many die of malaria and other diseases, not because they cannot be cured, but because it takes 3 days to get to an operational, staffed medical facility.

We do our best, but that seems so little. Please trust with us for a plan to be able to establish a “Basic Medical Care Centre”.

We are urgently looking for old functional medical equipment as well as medication and consumables.

We understand that OwnACowInAfrica is a part of the answer. The very goal of this initiative is to establish an economic sustainable cycle that can continually support community needs, while the cattle owners also enjoy an annual financial return. www.ownacowinafrica.com

If you have ideas to share please contact us